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COVID-19 Vaccinations

Vaccination Resources

It is our goal to assure that all residents, team members and their families have access to the COVID19 vaccine should they elect to receive.  Along with offering vaccine clinics at our locations, here you can find additional community resources.

Ohio:  Ohio Department of Health COVID19 Vaccination Site

Northern Kentucky:   St. Elizabeth COVID19 Vaccine Site

Indiana:  Indiana COVID19 Vaccination Site

Greater Cincinnati Health Collaborative:   Health Collaborative Test and Protect Cincy

COVID-19 Vaccination Q&A

GENERAL INFORMATION

  • The FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Pfizer-BioNTech (Pfizer) COVID-19 Vaccine, Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine and most recently the Johnson and Johnson Jansen COVID-19 Vaccine.

Pfizer EUA Fact Sheet

Moderna EUA Fact Sheet

J&J Jansen EUA Fact Sheet

  • The vaccines currently available for use in the US have all proven to be 100% effective in limiting severe illness and death from COVID19.  Therefore, the best vaccine for you is the one that you can get right now!
  • Yes!  All Carespring locations have held three vaccination clinics in an effort to get all residents and team members vaccination opportunities.  We are working with our state agencies, hospital systems and pharmacy providers on ongoing vaccination strategies.
  • Patients and team members in nursing homes are part of a high risk category and have been prioritized to receive the vaccine.  It is highly recommended that we all take the vaccine.  Although not mandatory, we have a goal of 100% resident vaccination and at least 75% of team members.
  • Help to end the Pandemic – Vaccination along with masking, social distancing and proper hand washing will be the best way for us to get back to normal inside and outside of the facilities.
  • Protect Yourself – the vaccinated person is protected from contracting COVID-19.
  • Protect Others – the vaccinated person is protected from infecting others with COVID-19.
  • Decrease the Risk of Serious Illness and Death to Self and Others.
  • Overall Safety – COVID-19 Vaccination is a safer more effective way to be protected from COVID-19.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Sunday, 12/13/2020, said people who have experienced severe reactions to prior vaccines or injectable drugs can still get the vaccine for Covid-19, but should discuss the risks with their doctors and be monitored for 30 minutes afterward. 
  • Severe allergic reactions to vaccines are extremely rare and were also rare during the vaccination trials, which excluded people with a history of anaphylaxis. The FDA has released data indicating .63% of participants who received the vaccine experienced serious adverse reactions, compared to .51% of people who received a placebo.

SAFETY AND POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS

  • Similar side effects to the flu vaccine:
    • injection site pain, swelling and/or redness
    • muscle or joint pain
    • tiredness
    • headache
    • fever or chills
    • nausea or feeling unwell
    • swollen lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy)
  • There is a remote chance that the vaccine could cause a severe allergic reaction. A severe allergic reaction would usually occur within a few minutes to one hour after getting a dose. Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include:
    • Difficulty breathing
    • Swelling of your face and throat
    • A fast heartbeat
    • A bad rash all over your body
    • Dizziness and weakness
  • Severe allergic reactions to vaccines are extremely rare and were also rare during the Pfizer/BioNTech trial, which excluded people with a history of anaphylaxis. The FDA has released data indicating .63% of participants who received the vaccine experienced serious adverse reactions, compared to .51% of people who received a placebo.
  • Side Effects (aches or pains) does not mean that the vaccine has given you COVID-19. Rather, this means that the vaccine is causing your body’s immune system to react and create antibodies to fight off the virus. In other words, if you feel some discomfort, then the vaccine is doing its job!
  • This is your body developing immunity. Clinical trial participants reported that the discomfort went away after a day, sometimes sooner. When you receive the second dose of the vaccine, the discomfort can be more pronounced. This is a normal reaction, so be prepared.
  • If you experience discomfort after the first dose of the vaccine, it is very important that you still receive the second dose a few weeks later for the vaccine to be effective.
  • In some cases, a person may already be infected with COVID-19 when they get the vaccine but are asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic. If they later have symptoms of COVID-19 or test positive for it, it does not mean they got COVID-19 from the vaccine.
  • Safety is the most important requirement for the vaccine and is assessed in trials by independent experts.
  • COVID-19 vaccines were tested in large clinical trials across the US and the world to make sure they meet safety standards. In the US, many people were recruited to participate in these trials to see how the vaccines offers protection to people of different ages, races, and ethnicities, as well as those with different medical conditions
  • Most adverse side effects occur within 6 weeks of vaccine administration, and the FDA has required 8 weeks of safety monitoring so it can track any side effects.
  • FDA advises a minimum of 3,000 participants to assess safety. The current phase 3 trials have 30,000 to 50,000 participants. This really demonstrates how safety is a top priority for the FDA and the medical community.
  • COVID -19 is a worldwide pandemic.  Thus the resources of the world were united to assure that there were abundant resources of time, money and personnel to research and develop a safe vaccine.
  • Typically, when a new vaccine or medical treatment is developed, the time from development to approval is not extraordinary.  What takes the most time is from approval to production of the actual product for mass distribution.
  • The COVID-19 vaccine was the first time that we produced a vaccine simultaneously while going through clinical trials and approval process.  Thus, the vaccine was ready for widespread distribution when approved.
  • FDA requires 50% efficacy of a COVID-19 vaccine (the COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna are showing 94-95% efficacy in preventing COVID-19 disease during this trial phase). Many other companies are working on a vaccine and we expect that others will be approved by the FDA.
  • FDA requires 8 weeks of safety data on the COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Approval of a vaccine for use in people involves multiple phases with different goals for assessing effectiveness and safety in different populations. There are a total of 4 phases and the vaccine must meet very intense safety criteria before completing each phase. Once a vaccine is approved for use after phase 3, it has been tested in tens of thousands of people and if no significant harmful side effects are noted, it is considered safe for use. Phase 4 involves continued monitoring and gathering of safety data. This type of clinical trial has been used for decades to approve medications and vaccines.
  • There are 2 advisory committees: (1) The Vaccine and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) that advises the FDA; (2) The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) that advises the CDC.
  • These advisory boards are independent. Their job is to monitor vaccines to ensure safety regardless of money, politics, etc.
  • The people on these committees are experts from academic institutions and they are vetted to avoid a conflict of interest. Experts who may have a conflict of interest are not put on these committees.
  • The committees evaluated the vaccine data for safety and efficacy, and also help to determine how it will be distributed.
  • There are 2 advisory committees: (1) The Vaccine and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) that advises the FDA; (2) The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) that advises the CDC.
  • These advisory boards are independent. Their job is to monitor vaccines to ensure safety regardless of money, politics, etc.
  • The people on these committees are experts from academic institutions and they are vetted to avoid a conflict of interest. Experts who may have a conflict of interest are not put on these committees.
  • The committees will evaluate the vaccine data for safety and efficacy, and also help to determine how it will be distributed.

LIFE AFTER VACCINATION

  • Yes, you may work as long as you have consulted with facility leadership for evaluation of symptoms and it has been determined that the symptoms you are experiencing have known correlation with vaccination.
  • Yes. Even though you have received your vaccine, most of the people around you have not. We know the vaccine prevents disease in the vaccinated person, but it still may be possible to transmit the disease to others, until the vaccine is in widespread use.
  • Wearing a mask, social distancing, and practicing hand hygiene protects those who have not been vaccinated, especially our residents in long-term care.
  • Yes, even if you have had COVID-19, it is safe to get the vaccine and this can add additional protection without causing any harm.
  • If you have had a test that shows you have COVID-19 antibodies, you should still get the vaccine. It is safe and can increase your protection from future COVID-19 infections.
  • It is likely that we will not know the answer to that question when a vaccine is released. That will take more research.
  • This vaccine may be like the annual flu vaccine, where we may need to have vaccine shots for COVID-19 on a regular basis. More research is needed to know this and it also depends on whether and how much the virus changes over the coming months to years.
  • We know, as more people get vaccinated in the facility and the surrounding community, this will lead to significant decreases in cases in our communities.   This in itself will provide us all greater flexibilities with visitation/group activities/full communal dining
  • As we go into early next year, we will aim for guidance from public health as to what vaccination means for visitation.  We feel resident vaccination should provide the resident flexibility with visitation (while still wearing a mask and being socially distant).    We will need guidance before this flexibility can start.
  • Even when people receive the vaccine they will not be immediately protected and will need to continue wearing masks, social distancing and practicing frequent hand hygiene.
  • Some vaccines will require 2 shots, with a few weeks between each shot, and protection will usually occur about 2 weeks after the second shot.
  • While no vaccine is 100% effective, some of the vaccines proposed are anticipated to be more than 90% effective. This will greatly reduce your risk of getting sick with COVID-19 and spreading COVID-19 to your loved ones.
    10. After I have had the second dose of the vaccine and it is 2 weeks after my second shot, do I still have to wear a mask?
  • Yes. Even though you have received your vaccine, most of the people around you have not. We know the vaccine prevents disease in the vaccinated person, but it still may be possible to transmit the disease to others, until the vaccine is in widespread use.
  • Wearing a mask, social distancing, and practicing hand hygiene protects those who have not been vaccinated, especially our residents in long-term care.